Domestic violence

If you are in immediate danger call the police on 999

How we can help 

If you are frightened or are being hurt by your partner, ex-partners or another family member, we will do our best to help you get the support, advice and information you need. 

Our staff have had domestic violence (DV) training. We understand that it is often difficult to talk about what is really going on at home, or in the family.  If you can come into the office, you will be able to speak to us in private. We realise it can be difficult to tell us everything at once but the more you can tell us about your concerns can help us, to help you. You can visit us at Mulliner House or talk to us over the phone. 

What is domestic violence

“Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. This can encompass, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse:

» psychological;
» physical;
» sexual;
» financial; or
» emotional.

“Controlling behaviour is: a range of acts designed to make a person subordinate and/or dependent by isolating them from sources of support, exploiting their resources and capacities for personal gain, depriving them of the means needed for independence, resistance and escape and regulating their everyday behaviour.

“Coercive behaviour is: an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim.”

“Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. This can encompass but is not limited to the following types of abuse: psychological, physical, sexual, financial and emotional. This includes so called 'honour’ based violence, female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage, and is clear that victims are not confined to one gender or ethnic group.”

What we know about domestic violence

Domestic violence can affect anyone regardless of race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, disability or lifestyle.

» At least one in four women and one in 13 men will experience domestic abuse in their lifetime (British Crime Survey)

» Every minute in the UK, the police receive a call from the public for assistance with domestic violence (Stanko, 2000)

» There are at least 750 000 children witnessing domestic violence each year (Department of Health 2002)